Floricanto Press     

Spanish/English Bilingual Books

By Title

 

Between Borders: Essays On Mexicana/Chicana History. Adelaida R. Del Castillo, Editor. ISBN 0915745186. 560 pgs. Includes biblio $38.95.

The most comprehensive and complete original history of U.S. Latinas of Mexican descent written by an outstanding team of Mexican and U.S. scholars and based on copious documentary sources from both countries. Between Borders has been hailed by the scholarly review media as "the most important piece of original research on Mexicana/ Chicana ever published." This collection of essays is a smashing success in terms of organization, presentation, significance of content, and theoretical approach. The essays reflect the maturation of the field in the 1980's.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chalino: A Chronicle Play of Fulgor and Death=Una Crónica Teatral de Fulgor y Muerte. By Julián Camacho Segura. ISBN 978-1481022002. $22.95.

With “Chalino,” Julian Camacho writes about a raw, unflinching Mexican icon with an unapologetic honesty only he can provide. He excels at bringing this story to larger than life tale because he possesses one of the most experienced voices among his contemporaries.” Oscar Barajas, Author, “True Tales from the Wireless Clothesline.” Rosalino “Chalino” Sánchez was a Mexican immigrant from the Mexican state of Sinaloa who came to the US in search of opportunity. In his pursuit of perseverance his gift and talent for writing corridos for the common working class man initiated a world wind phenomena that appealed to Mexican-American youth in Los Angeles, California. Chalino’s corridos provided a cultural medium in which Chicanos identified with their own roots.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Delirium of Simon Bolivar. El delirio de Simón Bolívar. By Tina Datsko de Sánchez. Translated with commentary by José Sánchez-H., Prologue by Edward James Olmos.ISBN 978-1888205343. $25.95.

This is a joint Spanish/English bilingual publication of Floricanto Press and Berkeley Press. INTERNATIONAL PRAISE FOR THE DELIRIUM OF SIMON BOLIVAR “Beautifully exploring the theme that ‘only those who see the invisible can do the impossible,’ this exciting, lucid, and often heartbreaking collection of poems tracks the life and consciousness of the great Liberator Simon Bolivar. There are poems that tell us how he was loved, what freedom means in today’s Latin America, how he felt as he contemplated death and exile, and much, much more. Looking at this towering figure from countless separate angles and through countless lenses, we begin to understand the man who sought ‘to challenge/ like Don Quixote/ what all believe they see.’ A must read.” —José Rivera Academy Award® nominee for Best Adapted Screenplay (The Motorcycle Diaries)

“An important topic, never before so deeply explored in poetry.” —Jorge Ruiz Bolivian pioneer filmmaker and winner of the Smithsonian’s James Smithson Bicentennial Medal (Come Back, Sebastiana)

“Tina Datsko de Sánchez’s book, The Delirium of Simón Bolívar, seems to me an important work. Her desire to make known in the USA an historical figure so extraordinary, courageous and lucid is an admirable goal. It reveals the degree of Tina’s spirituality, which moves her to bring back a lost but necessary memory and share with her compatriots the presence of a human being of absolute greatness as was Simón Bolívar. Her verses struck me as very beautiful, with a notable capacity of synthesis, and holders of the undeniable emotion of doing something for all.” —Jorge Sanjines Cannes Film Festival Winner of the Great Young Directors Award (That’s the Way It Is)

“The Delirium of Simón Bolívar brings to life, through inspired poetry, a life that should be known by all.” —Ligiah Villalobos Writer/Producer and winner of the Estela Award (Under the Same Moon)

“Every verse is music, philosophy, pure magic. Different compositions, at times, refer to the history of a true hero, the nostalgia for a “mythic time” where everything seems to have paused forever. The author also refers at times to things that can seem simple, but with the punctuality of the cruel reality of a fierce suffering, as if making it normal and part of daily life. All of that carries the reader to another dimension; her poetry in this sense might be called almost “magic.” Poems that travel across time and space, among the infinite dimensions of the universe. The metaphors that are included in the volume are also of an artistic depth without equal. The author is an architect of poetry that is sincere, authentic, and spontaneous. One might say it is poetry inspired by the instinct of the heart.” —Valentina Casagrande ARCI – FILMSTUDIO ’90 de Varese

 

 

 

 

Desire I Remember, but love no. By Sergio Téllez-Pon. Translated by Don Cellini. ISBN 978-1484082409. $11.95.

What happens when a young poet in Mexico City writes about his coming out experiences? In No recuerdo el amor sino el deseo / Desire I remember but love, no the author shares these first steps: new romances, one-night-stands, unreturned phone calls, erotic adventures and disillusionments. What we discover is that these experiences are not unique to one individual, but belong to all of us. This is a book that crosses many boundaries, both geographical and emotional. Poetry of language and imagination, especially its intimate and earthy episodes, and an open heart (but in slant verse), this book welcomes – as if several shades were refracted and condensed into a quick, minimalist mosaic – a multitude of tones, voices, and passionate interests that acknowledge each other. In this way it manages happily to offer both poetry for poetry’s sake as well as poetry for the sake of the poet: thoroughly youthful, concrete, and in living color. – José Joaquín Blanco Sergio Téllez-Pon is one of Mexico’s leading poets of queer identity, but his work until now has been almost unknown in the United States. With Don Cellini’s lucid translation of No recuerdo el amor sino el deseo, Téllez-Pon’s sultry and lyrical poetry comes alive for an English-speaking readership. This book of first loves and first heartbreaks speaks with a lonesome voice of fire and ash, each poem is a feverish spear, a cup brimming with sensuality, with sorrow and the everyday joys that keep “hope beating strong.” I find that each poem discloses something—about myself, about the world, about life—that I didn’t know I needed to learn. I hope that other readers will join me in reveling in these soulful and celebratory and heart-breaking verses. —Lauro Vázquez, Letras Latinas

Don Cellini is a poet, translator and photographer. A book of poems Candidates for Sainthood and Other Sinners / Aprendices de santo y otros pecadores, in collaboration with Fer de la Cruz, is forthcoming from Mayapple Press. He is a recipient of fellowships from the King Juan Carlos Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Cellini is professor emeritus at Adrian College in Michigan.

 

 

 

 

Encounter Between Cuentos and Versos. By Irene Pérez. ISBN: 978-1494379919 $14.95

This is a publication of Floricanto Press. "Encounter between cuentos and versos" is a gem to treasure as stories told in poetic forms for readers of all ages—from young adults to the more experienced and seasoned booklover. These poems show us a childhood lived in Puerto Rico, and they uncover a heart awakening to meet the complexity of a new life in the U.S. mainland. The many contrasts found here serve as portals into a private self facing fear and courage—“If you dare startle what’s inside the wall…”—and into the public self looking outwards with compassion—“But one day/Beyond the noise of all histories . . .” The Spanish dispersed throughout this collection adds a necessary pulse to the poet’s love and care for the beat and rhythm of language. But at its core, this work stands strong with meaning, encountering beauty, through lyricism, in the past and in the attention to the now.

In these sensual, intensely given, sometimes fantastical poems and prose pieces, we are given scenes of conception, birth and childhood, of a family uprooted from Puerto Rico to Brooklyn, landing in Jersey City and beyond. In Perez’s world, everything is made to count, the body passage into white dresses, “life fires and hurricanes”, “long hallways marked by doors”, the astrological influence of the planets in our whirling heavens. Her’s is an original, colorful and complex voice, and her poems do honor to our memories. —Colette Inez, author of The Luba Poems.

Cultures collide in this riveting work, but Irene Perez navigates us to safety with her glittering verse. While the world she paints is agridulce, she never forgets to sweeten all that is sour. Get ready to be transported. —Stephanie Elizondo Griest, author of Mexican Enough: My Life Between the Borderlines.

In and out, up and down, here and there, then and now, body and spirit, hard and soft, black, white, and colors in between, wind and silence, water and sand, asleep and awake...take turns, join and separate in these poems and prose work to create a tapestry of feelings shared through lyricism and passion for language. —Nora de Hoyos Comstock, Count of Me: Tales of Sisterhoods and Fierce Friendships /Cuenta Conmigo: Historias Conmovedoras de Hermandad y Amistades Incondicionales.

Irene Pérez Irene’s short stories and poems have appeared in Kalyani Magazine, South Florida Arts Journal, Northern Liberties Light, New Mirage Journal, Acentos Review, Ardent, Mangrove, Gulfstreaming Magazine, Long Shot, The Américas Review, The Bilingual Review. She has written non-fiction pieces for Somos Padres: A Newsletter for Parents and Educators, LatinGirl Magazine and Críticas. She is currently working on her first novel.

 

 

 

 

Jalapeño Blues. Trinidad Sánchez, Jr. ISBN: 978-0-915745-72-2. $14.95.

"Trinidad Sánchez, Jr. was at his lyric craft for several decades before his death. He was a prominent poeta Tejano, who provided us in his lyric writings a rich Latino landscape embedded in an indifferent Anglo world covered by the knit of the ethnic fabric and soul of the Mexican, Chicano. He posited a background of side street allegories--literally representations of other things and symbolically expressing a deeper, often spiritual, moral, or political meaning--asphalt lives of inner-city dwellers, often disguised by the cadence of their conjoined languages, food, soul, tears, and laughs of their experience. His language is direct, his hurt is real as tamales con jalapeños, and his hope offers a collision of syntax, poetic physicality, images, and messages, both poignant and real. Trinidad Sánchez’s are necessary poems for a people who seek and demand justice, for children in free lunch with parents with obfuscating futures, for a society who uses and disposes of culture like fads and fashion. When children hear his poems their faces light up and their emotions pour with his words like wrapped in a warm home-made soft taco de carne. When adults listen to his poems their chests and foreheads rise tall like sails pushed by the ocean winds full of Chicano pride. His poems will be read and reread for generations to come. Roberto Cabello-Argandoña, Editor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noches de Adrenalina\Nights of Adrenaline. Carmen Ollé. Translated by Anne Archer. La Mujer Latina. English/Spanish bilingual parallel text. ISBN: 0-915745-46-1. $14.95.

"CAUTION: Nights of Adrenaline is a text of intense, incisive, and extreme violence--but also, paradoxically, and at certain moments, of an almost innocent tenderness. The obsessive exploration of the feminine condition, exploration of body and mind and of their unstable and intermingled overlappings, as well as of a woman's conflictive social placement in a world made neither by nor for her, yields a tension that is highly explosive in a poetry that relinquishes nothing: not the banal, not the quotidian, not the obscene.

Carmen Ollé is one of the most important Latin American poets of the twentieth century." Antonio Cornejo Polar, University of California at Berkeley and Universidad de San Marcos, Lima.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Noldo and his Magical Scooter at the Battle of The Alamo=Noldo y su patinete mágico en la Batalla de El Álamo. By Armando Rendón. ISBN 978-1490428659. $14.95.

Noldo is a Mexican-American boy, who, after building his own scooter from scraps, is magically transported from 1950’s San Antonio, Texas, into the middle of of the Battle of the Alamo, where he befriends a lad who lived more than a hundred years earlier. He lives through hard times, making do with very little. The story forges a link for Chicanos to their historical roots in the Southwest, revealing a past that has been otherwise excluded from school textbooks and the mass media. Noldo es un chico mexicoamericano, quien, después de construir su propio patinete de materiales de desecho, es mágicamente transportado del San Antonio de los años 50’s a la Batalla de el Álamo, en donde se hace amigo de un muchacho que había vivido más que cien años antes.

Él vive aquellos tiempos tan difíciles, siendo muy creativo con lo poco que tiene. La historia tiende un puente que va desde los chicanos de hoy día hasta sus raíces históricas en el Suroeste, revelándonos una historia que ha sido excluida de los libros de texto y de los medios de comunicación. Armando Rendón grew up in the Westside barrio of San Antonio, Texas, and much of our hero’s story and background sounds a lot like the life and times of the author. Armando moved to California in 1950 and lives near Berkeley with his wife, Helen. He authored Chicano Manifesto, the first book about Chicanos by a Chicano, in 1971. He is also the founder and editor of the online literary magazine, Somos en escrito, which he launched in November 2009.

Armando Rendón creció en el barrio del oeste de San Antonio, Tejas, y gran parte de la historia de su héroe y de su ambiente semejan bastante la vida y la época de su autor. Armando se mudó a California en 1950, vive en Berkeley, California, con su esposa, Helen. Armando es autor del Chicano Manifesto, el primer libro sobre los chicanos escrito por un chicano, en 1971. Es fundador y editor de la revista cibernética, Somos en escrito, creada en noviembre de 2009.

 

 

 

 

 

The Ones Santa Anna Sold. Valle-Sentíes, Raquel. ISBN: 978-1497473300 $15.95

“This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. These poems are powerful, immediate, and raw. And they speak of universal pain and disappointment. But also they are about a world that is unique and not so well-known this city of Laredo. As a writer, I am admiring of your perception and your style. You are a wonderful poet. ---Lori Carlson Hijuelos New York editor of Cool Salsa, Red Hot Salsa and Voices in Third Person. Raquel Sentíes has a direct and honest poetic voice. Her poetry is lyrical without being romantic: it is sensual, ironic, questioning. It speaks to us bi-lingually: in language and in culture. She speaks of growing up and living in a world that is treacherous yet somehow in the end satisfying. There are many moments of truth in these poems which are not always easy to read but yet are always revealing. They are filled with violence, sadness, betrayal, unfulfilled longings, dreams, and of course death. The ghosts who haunt Senties’ house and her mind remind us that we too have something to contribute to these hauntings. ---Prof. Tey Diana Rebolledo, Modern Languages, Univ. of New Mexico and well known literary critic; author of Infinite Divisions and Women Singing in the Snow.

 

 

 

 

 

La Picardía Chicana: Latino Folk Humor. Folklore Latino Jocoso. José R. Reyna. Edited by Andrea Alessandra Cabello, M. D., with the Assistance of Gloria Canales. ISBN: 0-915745-42-9. $23.95.

Mexican American, Chicano folk literature has been of interest to folklorists and been collected incidentally, mostly as part of compilations of the longer and more prestigious standard folktale. José Reyna began his collection of jokes 1969, and some of the jokes compiled then, appeared in Stanley L. Robe’s Antología del Saber Popular [1971]. Picardía Chicana, the result of thirty years of work, contains five hundred twenty-six jokes which are reproduced here verbatim from tape recordings collected in the field. Some jokes were collected by the author as field research projects at Texas A & M University-Kingsville [1972-77] and at the University of New Mexico [1977-1984]. Others are synopses of jokes that Dr. Reyna learned over the years and took the liberty of translating to English for presentation here. Other terms used for this subject are Latino folklore. Latino jokes. Latino folk humor. Folklore Latino. Folclor latino. Mexican American Folk humor.

This book represents the best of Mexican American joke tradition. The title Picardía Chicana was selected in keeping with a well-known sixteenth-century Hispanic tradition of El Lazarillo de Tormes published originally in 1554, which spawned a new literary genre—la novela picaresca. Both the pícaro and the novela picaresca would surface in the New World—in Mexico—in the early nineteenth century (José Joaquín Fernández de Lizardi, El Periquillo Sarniento).

 

 

 

 

La vendedora de nubes. Clouds for Sale. Poniatowska, Elena. ISBN: 978-1499244564 $14.95

This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. This book is part of Floricanto's Children's and Juvenile Book Collection.

A little girl had a dream that became a reality: a beautiful cloud that followed her everywhere. One morning she decided she had to sell her pet cloud, because her family was very poor. She led the cloud to the farmers’ market and started calling out “Cloud for Sale!” A lot of customers came by, but they all wanted to use the cloud for their own purposes. Choosing a new owner for the cloud was not an easy task. Who do you think took off with the cloud? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poems of Ramón López Velarde. Ramón López Velarde. Edited and translated by Mark Jacobs. ISBN: 978-1494243791 $22.95

“The essential and supreme poet of our extensive Americas.” —Nobel Laureate Pablo Neruda

“López Velarde is the most admired and most carefully studied poet in Mexico . . . [He] left us a few poems . . . so perfect that it is foolish to lament those that death prevented him from writing.”—Nobel Laureate Octavio Paz

“López Velarde . . . was a wonder.” —Jorge Luis Borges

Millions of Mexicans know Ramón López Velarde as the author of Suave Patria, the national poem of Mexico, and a modernist masterpiece. But few inside or outside Mexico know the high opinion of him held by his fellow greats of Latin American poetry. López Velarde's Wikipedia entry correctly states: “Despite his importance, he remains a virtual unknown outside his own country.” As an example of how unknown, all the other major Mexican poets (and even some minor ones) are in The Oxford Book of Latin American Poetry, but not López Velarde. He is truly a forgotten modernist master. In 1963, Pablo Neruda published his own selection of the poems of López Velarde. The Chilean Nobel Laureate even rented rooms in a former residence of López Velarde's where Neruda "began to live in the full atmosphere of López Velarde, whose poetry began to penetrate me . . . There is no more distilled poetry than his . . . [He] gave to the poetry of the Americas a flavor and a fragrance that will last forever . . . Few poets with so few words have told us so much and so eternally of their own land . . . [His] brief pages reach, in some subtle way, the eternity of poetry."

 

 

 

 

Xavier and the Bully. Xavier y el Chico Malo. Ronald W. Lemley Macías. Colección Floricanto Juvenil. ISBN:13: 978-1505209136. $12.95

When the roof of their old school fell in, Xavier and his friends are transferred to a newer school at the edge of the city.
They wondered if a group of Spanish speaking kids from the farm lands of the west county would get along in the new place.
Xavier had driven by it a few times with his father and it looked like a big white castle surrounded by gardens. What were the students like? Xavier hoped that they weren’t creepy or mean like the tricky Jones boys on the Kid’s Network.

Cuando se cayó el techo de su vieja escuela, Xavier y sus amigos fueron transferidos a una escuela nueva en el borde de la ciudad.
Se preguntaban si un grupo de niños de habla hispana de las tierras agrícolas de la provincia al oeste pudiera llevarse bien en el nuevo lugar.
Xavier había pasado por alli un par de veces con su padre y parecía un gran castillo blanco rodeado de jardines. ¿Cómo serían los estudiantes? Xavier esperaba que no fueran tan difíciles como los chicos malos Jones del Kid’s Network.

Ronald Lemley Macias is a bilingual teacher who grew up in Northern California. Much of the inspiration for this book was taken from real experiences from his childhood in the Pacific Northwest.
Ronald Lemley Macias es un maestro bilingüe que se crió en el norte de California. Gran parte de la inspiración para este libro fue tomada de experiencias reales de su infancia en el noroeste del Pacífico.