Floricanto Press     

New Releases

 

by order of publication

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

The Spectacle of Let: The Oliet & Obit. By Samuel Zamarripa. ISBN:978-1546370796. $24.95. 6" x 9" (15.24 x 22.86 cm) 354 pages Black & White on Cream paper

Fiction Latino Hispanic, Chicano literature, Latino literature, Latino Fiction Book

Open Samuel Zamarripa’s debut novel, The Spectacle of Let – the Oliet and Obit, and embark on a literary journey through the imaginative work of his protagonist, Otto Cristóbal Almeida, and his mysterious manuscript, The Voice of the Looking Mountains, a book within a book.

Almeida has a fantastic story to tell about Creation and the first spoken word of God. It is a tale spun from the boundless stories of his numinous paramour, Niva Miramontes, who speaks with uncommon conviction. “In the beginning,” she insists, “God said ‘Let,’ and the rest is just a spectacle.”   
 
From a mysterious monastery in Veracruz, Mexico, to an overnight cruise on the majestic Hudson River, Miramontes reveals her heavenly gift of parable. Weaving together the generational saga of the Portuondo family—their salacious past and their journey to redemption—Niva’s tales captivate Otto.   
 
Overwhelmed by Niva’s spellbinding words, Otto falls into the clutches of an Oliet—a dream’s dream, a place where fiction invades life, yielding truth of a different kind. His book languishes and finally lands on the desk of his brooding editor, L. Rand Bonarias, who plunges into the unfinished manuscript and discovers that while Otto’s love story may be a literary gimmick, his unbelievable account of the story of Creation and Niva Miramontes is more than artful prose.  
 
A gospel of fantastic spirituality and abiding love, The Spectacle of Let – the Oliet and Obit, reimagines the marvel of Creation and the unbound possibilities of a single word.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Gorgaroth. By Miguel Ángel Páez Muñoz. ISBN: 978-1514291160 . $20.95.

 

The Royal Academy of the Spanish Language, la veneradísima Real Academia de la Lengua, the institution that protects Castillian from barbarians and linguistic rebels, must be up in arms!! Miguel Ángel Páez Muñoz is not only a creative writer of the first order, but also he is someone who makes the story and the characters the center of his literary creations, not the Spanish language, the Castillian, per se, rather it becomes just a fluid, compliant, and convenient vehicle to transport his ideas. This author takes the Spanish syntax, morphology, and linguistic conventions and throw them out the window, however his words are clear, his stories are funny and enthralling. Leyla Namazie, LatinoBooks.net.

 

“Qué bello el bilingüismo, la lengua inglesa, esas runas modernas que esconden tantos secretos, recovecos, acertijos, muñequitas rusas unas dentro de otras, misterios de sociólogo patrio.”  - JORGE LUIS BORGES

“Sí, es verdad, me inspiré en Gorgaroth para el personaje del coronel Aureliano Buendía. Tienen la misma mística del olor del mar caribe. Sé que es difícil de entender, pero el espacio-tiempo tiene esas curvas.”– GABRIEL GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ hasta arriba de Prozac

“Prefiero a Jack Skeleton, es más goth. Pero una versión de Hollywood dirigida por Tim Burton no estaría nada mal.” - LUCÍA SOLAZ FRASQUET
“¿Gorgaroth? ¿En qué libro de la saga saqué este personaje? Porque seguro que es mío. Ya ni me acuerdo de cuántos metí en Una Canción de Hielo y Fuego. ¿Me está plagiando el tal Páez éste?”  - GEORGE R.R. MARTIN

 

 


 

Rock and Roll Por Vida: Hispanics In Rock, Metal, and My Journey. By Manuel Hernandez Alzaga, Edited by Leyla Namazie

ISBN: 978-1544896984 418 pages. $24.95

Latino Collective biography book/ Hispanic & Latino book , Chicano musicology , Latinos in music book, Hispanic rock book, Latinos--Heavy metal music book, Latino Non Fiction book , Barrio life Non Fiction book

 

This book is published by Floricanto Press. 
Rock & Roll Por Vida is about the author growing up in a poor Mexican immigrant family in Los Angeles and falling in love with hard rock and heavy metal music at a young age. The book looks at the cultural, social and religious aspects as well as the contributions Hispanics have made to the music over the years. Hard rock and heavy metal are very passionate forms of music, and Hispanics are very passionate people. Musicians interviewed for this project include current and former members of Blue Oyster Cult, Stryper, Quiet Riot, Ozzy, Dio, Whitesnake, Slaughter, Ted Nugent, Thin Lizzy, Hurricane, Armored Saint and the Randy Castillo Family. The author also intertwines his journey through life and how hard rock and heavy metal and his spirituality have helped him achieve many goals over the years. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Cuentos migrantes. Edited by Henry Tarco-Carrera. ISBN: 978-1544287782, 6" x 9" (15.24 x 22.86 cm), Black & White on Cream paper. 252 pages $22.95

Fiction / Hispanic & Latino, Hispanic literature, Latino literature Immigration, Hispanic literature, Latino immigrants--Social life and customs Fiction, Immigrant life Fiction

 


“¿Qué se siente ser extranjero y deambular en una tierra ajena aprendiendo de nuevo a todo, a respirar, a hablar, a sentir y a soñar? Los narradores ecuatorianos se aventuran a explorar en estos cuentos una manera de exteriorizar por medio de sus palabras lo que se siente al vivir en los espacios de otros.” Manuel Medina, The University of Louisville. 

“Es, en suma, un mosaico de historias unidas por tiempos rotos, por huidas que muchas veces llevan al vacío, uno lleno de vicisitudes, de dolor, de soledades y de ausencias marcado por un destino inexorable en una civilización incivil que devora a sus hijos.” Jorge Machín Lucas, The University of Winnipeg.  

 
“Cuentos magníficos, llenos de misterio, peligro, amor y posibilidades eternas. Estos escritores ecuatorianos están llevando al cuento a un territorio nuevo de este siglo.” Ernesto Quiñonez, catedrático de Cornell University y escritor de Bodega Dreams y Chango’s Fire.  

Cuentos migrantes is an unimpressive title for such magnificent collection of short stories by seasoned writers. The stories do not have a simple remit as it might appear; these are no forthright stories. Instead, they each take one aspect of the migrant experience and provide a whole new discernment of lives in a new country. After all, the heart holds a lot of representational weight. The characters identified by their status or gender (the woman, the husband), a clear set of conflicting rules to obey from both the old and new country, the places and times, people and events spotlight the tender underbelly of the human condition in all its glory and despair on these varied stages of fiction that emerge from the dark reality of migrant life. Without a doubt, Henry Tarco Carrera has rendered onto us an impressive and exceptional collection of tales. LatinoBook.Net

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Cuentos del norte. Historias del sur. Hemil García Linares, Edited by Roberto Cabello-Argandoña ISBN: 978-1544750460, 6" x 9" (15.24 x 22.86 cm), Black & White on Cream paper. 126 pages $14.95

Fiction / Hispanic & Latino, Chicano literature, Latino literature Immigration, Hispanic literature, Latino immigrants--Social life and customs Fiction, Immigrant life Fiction

 

 

This anthology is published by Floricanto Press.  www.FloricantoPress.com 

En Cuentos del norte, historias del sur nos enfrentamos al racismo, a la pobreza, y a la violencia callejera, pero en ellos también aflora la fortaleza de la mujer luchadora en la figura de la madre, la precaria vida familiar, el barrio, el amor siempre imposible cuanto más ideal. Los temas del norte giran, por supuesto, en torno a la difícil existencia del emigrado, a la falta de identidad, al terrorismo y al anonimato de las grandes ciudades. Hemil García es un escritor de su tiempo, pergeña sus historias desde el país que lo acoge, los Estados Unidos, con la autoridad de quien necesita decirlo todo, pero construyendo intriga, para deleite de los lectores de acá y de allá. —Carmen Ollé destacada poetisa, autora de Noches de Adrenalina/Nights of Adrenaline, Floricanto Press. 

Hemil García brings together a masterful collection of short stories that narrates the vivid, and surreal experience of newly arrived immigrants, people transplanted to a world where they can't communicate, they can't find decent jobs, and even hope, as frequently happens, escapes their grasps. The stories are humanely touching; the narrative is inexplicably gripping and riveting as they relate immigrants attempting to redefine themselves as they confront a new promised land replete of new challenges, abject poverty, and desperation. Hemil García Linares is a newly emerging voice that forcefully touches the conscience of the readers. LatinoBooks.net  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Almond Tequila. By Annie Mary Perez. Edited by Leyla Namazie. ISBN: 978-1544188041 $19.95

Fiction / Hispanic & Latino, Chicano literature, Latino literature, Hispanic literature, Latinos--Social life and customs Fiction, Barrio life Fiction

 

Puerto San Carlos is Jake’s idea of paradise. A place where he could fish all day, play his guitar, and drink tequila all day long. He has been visiting this dusty little fishing village with its colorful inhabitants and curious superstitions and customs for the past eight summers. When Socorro Reyes vows to put a brujería on her former friend for cheating her, Jake persuades her to let karma handle it. When Ricardo Avila fails to carry out his dead mother’s wishes, the man receives an unexpected visitor. When Xochitl Madrigal asks Jake to captain El Barco de Libros, little does he know that they will be sailing into the eye of a storm. Between all this and trying to save the endangered sea turtles, it turns out to be an eventful summer, leading Jake to make a life changing decision. 

Captivating and descriptive, Almond Tequila evokes the richness of Baja California where stunning scenery, aquatic wildlife, tasty cuisine, and warm melodies soothe the soul. The reader is immersed in folkloric culture, gentle surf, island breezes, and the amazing flavor of chocolate clams.—José Chavez, Author, Estrellitas y Nopales~ Little Stars and Cactus 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Cuban Seeds. By Louis Villalba. ISBN: 978-1541185524 208 pages. $24.95

Hispanic Biography, Latino Biography, Cuban American Biography, Cuban American literature, Latino literature, Hispanic literature, Latinos--Social life and customs, Cuban American Social life and customs

 

 

Chelo fled Cuba in search of freedom in 1961. Born in a small village near Havana in 1921, she married Adolfo Llano in 1944. The couple resided in Artemisa, the cradle of the Cuban Revolution of 1959. They came in contact with some of its most prominent leaders and endured the cruel communist tyranny, which ended their prosperity and cut short their bliss. The Llanos left the island empty-handed. Chelo’s steel-forged nerves and resourcefulness steered her family to success in their new world. It would have been easier to be a fake revolutionary like Fidel Castro—who used deception and wielded a gun to suppress the free will of his people—than be a real fighter and do what she did day after day. Her life stood out as a monument to Cuban tenacity. History books did not record the events because she had lacked political ambitions and had not tortured or killed anyone. Yet, her anonymity would have been an irreparable loss. 

When does a memoir become, not only an individual’s tale, but a testimony of historical events? When the narration weaves dramatic personal stories within a country’s history, and when each historical event as it evolved impacted on people lives and destinies. Louis Villalba’s “Cuban Seeds” tells an astonishing tale centered on Chelo, a politically quiet and a towering figure, and the Llanos family, whose struggles against a Communist dictatorship and yearnings for freedom led them to America in 1961. This book is highly recommended. LatinoBooks.Net 

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Coconut Versus. By Daniel Jose Ruiz. Edited by Leyla Namazie. ISBN: 978-1540806307 364 pages. $24.95

Fiction / Hispanic & Latino, Chicano literature, Latino literature, Hispanic literature, Latinos--Social life and customs Fiction, Barrio life Fiction

Forthcoming: place advancec orders at a discount

Everyone calls Miguel Reyes a coconut, brown on the outside and white on the inside. Among his family in central California, he’s the too soft city-boy. His family try to teach him what it means to be a Reyes and to understand manhood and its value within a rural life. Miguel doesn’t always want to be a man by their often-conflicting definitions. In Arizona, he’s a brown boy in an upper-class, white neighborhood. He has no real friends as no one there seems to understand how someone could be brown without being poor. He spends most of his time alone or playing video games with his little brother Angel, yet Angel is already starting to excel past Miguel in all areas in which children are judged. Miguel falls in love for the first time, and he falls in love with a sport that provides an outlet for his growing anger, but then his growing anger is part of the problem.

 
In Los Angeles, he’s a fake Mexican that speaks too good. He finds love, and he finds his place in high school as the guardian of the outcasts, but his desire to be a defender and alpha male simply causes more problems. In Irvine, CA, he’s a punk rock kid in a suburban paradise. His mother has also taken a position at the same college, and Miguel attempts to reconcile his working-class mythos with his parents’ expectations. In the Inland Empire, CA, he is best friends with a local legend, Scott, and Miguel meets the love of his young life, Sunshine. Scott also loves her, and Miguel must navigate his feelings but also the realities of the ownership inherent to the world’s accepted definition of love. Miguel builds a life there, one that is defined by himself rather than others.  

Daniel Ruiz, in taut and urgent prose, that often takes your breath away, (like a punch to your gut), reveals the often turbulent life of Miguel Reyes as he navigates his way from confused child to manhood. With a cast of characters ranging from fierce to loving to humorous, Ruiz has given us an essential bildungsroman befitting America in the 21st Century. —Bruce Bauman, author of the novels And the Word Was and Broken Sleep 

Coconut Versus is a coming of age story that brims with energy and originality as it travels across modern, millennial California. Daniel Ruiz uses his ample gifts as a writer and observer of his generation’s longings to spin tales of love, rage and self-knowledge that are intelligently and passionately told. —Héctor Tobar, author of The Barbarian Nurseries and the New York Times bestselling Deep Down Dark.  

 

 

 


 

 

The Fall and Rise of Champagne Sánchez. By Rudy J. Miera. ISBN: 978-1539869160 336 pages. $24.95

Fiction / Hispanic & Latino, Chicano literature, Latino literature, Hispanic literature, Latinos--Social life and customs Fiction, Barrio life Fiction

 

This book is published by Floricanto Press. 
Trouble always came for "Champagne" Sánchez…this time, the law was on trouble’s side. Whether it is his attempts to make a living selling fireworks, vacuum cleaners or burritos, things can, and do, go terribly wrong. "The Fall and Rise of ‘Champagne’ Sánchez," is a fast-paced modern narrative, set in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It is a “rags to riches to rejection to redemption” story. The witness to Champagne’s Fall is his cousin, the street-smart newspaper reporter, Adelita Chávez. The chronicler not only of the struggles of her cousin, but the scribe of her own observations of life around her (in the form of ‘Journal Entries’); she writes of the pain of watching her mother deal with breast cancer and describes characters in the barrio from Doña Mariluz to Magdalena Moya. 

 

 

 

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Yearners. By Marco Portales. ISBN: 978-1540879189 250 pages. $23.95

Fiction / Hispanic & Latino, Chicano literature, Latino literature, Hispanic literature, Latino Politics Fiction, Barrio life Fiction, Latino literature, Hispanic literature--Social life and customs, Latino literature Social life and customs

 

Yearners hope, pray, and wish life would be different, with needs shaping developments. Individual circumstances lead to short and long-term goals and desires, engendering, among other issues, men who heed women from those who do not. 
In "Yearners," Herson Moya and family members, friends, and closest employees weigh Herson’s prospects while he considers a run for Texas governor. His acquaintances know the world as it exists, yet spend their days on options that should improve life. But the status quo is not easily changed. Realities appear to have been created by design, and kept in place by forces that counter demographics. The status quo seems immovable, resisting human effort. Still, yearners nudge the world every day, changing views and altering society to promise more satisfying lives. 

 

 

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Communicate! Confidence Skills for English Learners. By Ray DiZazzo. Edited by Leyla Namazie. ISBN: 978-1539803782 174 pages. $19.95

Language Arts--English learners; English as a Second language (ESL); Communication Studies--Language learning

 

This book is published by Floricanto Press. 
Communicate! Confidence Skills for English Learners is a compelling example of Mr. DiZazzo’s philosophy on the power of personal communication. Writing in a simple, conversational style, this newest book covers all aspects of communication skills and ways they can help English Learners feel more confident using their newly acquired vocabulary. Speaking of the relationship between words and communication skills
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Idealismo Triunfador de la Juventud: Victoria sobre la infamia. By Héctor Pereyra-Suárez , Edited by Leyla Namazie. ISBN-13: 978-1533257215. 140 pages. $16.95

Fiction--Latino business and economics; Latino--Social life and customs; Latino Spanish Fiction, Hispanic Spanish Fiction

This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. 
Todos los personajes se hacen reales, gente de carne y hueso: muy verdaderos. El lector se enamora de unos y detesta a otros. Hasta ve, de cuerpo entero, como es cada uno físicamente, del modo en que se viste y su manera de hablar. Se enfada con los que son hipócritas, viciosos, faltos de honradez o crueles, y espera verlos castigados, lo cual presencia más tarde. Se encariña con los personajes buenos, les perdona errores, y se deleita cuando triunfan. Los personajes malos no cambian. Los buenos sorprenden al revelar, sin darse cuenta, que son cada vez más virtuosos: justos, castos, honestos, íntegros. Y el lector se inflama con la aspiración de ser como ellos. 
Cuando los viejos antagonistas creen haber derrotado a los protagonistas jóvenes, en realidad les dan inesperadas oportunidades para destacarse. El lector se va convirtiendo en otro personaje e integrándose al grupo a medida que avanza en la lectura. Sin levantarse del sillón de su casa o de donde se encuentre leyendo, Idealismo triunfador de la juventud lo transporta, como de vacaciones, para disfrutar de otras latitudes y otros tiempos. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Las Comadres Book of the Month Club - February, 2017 Selection

Love Field. By Virginia Alanís . ISBN-13: 978-1539678809. $23.95

Latino Fiction---Social Life and customs, Chicano literature, Latinas Coming of age, Latinos Family life, Latinos Assimilation, Hispanic Social life and customs, Fiction / Hispanic & Latino, Latino Fiction---Immigration

This book is published by Floricanto Press:

www.FloricantoPress.com 

Laura Cano is a Mexican-American teenager living in Dallas in the mid-1980s. She comes from a traditional family from Nuevo León, Mexico. When Laura was a child, she and her family moved to Dallas in search of new opportunities. Laura’s parents work in a factory, while she strives for something better for herself—a future as a lawyer in America. To reach that professional objective, Laura must navigate past the ignorance and superstitions of her family, in addition to the dangers and obstacles of an unknown and foreign world. Can she distance herself from her relations and negotiate all the challenges ahead of her to reach her goals, or will her life be thrown off course by her ties and obligations to her family? 

 

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Ventas al por mayor: Una cuestión de confianza . By José Caseros Sánchez. ISBN-13: 978-1539859239. $23.95

spanish Fiction---Social Life and customs, spanish literature, Hispanics Family life, Hispanic Social life and customs, Fiction / Hispanic & Latino, Hispanic Fiction---Business and economics

This book is published by Floricanto Press:

www.FloricantoPress.com 

This book is published by Floricanto Press.  
www.FloricantoPress.com 
La vida de Luis Alonso parece idílica, a ojos de muchos. Directivo de una importante compañía, ha logrado casi todo cuanto se ha propuesto en su existencia; un cargo bien remunerado, varios inmuebles, coches, prestigio profesional . . . Incluso está casado con una mujer preciosa, y tiene dos hijos. Aparentemente, sus expectativas se han cumplido, después de tantos años de duro esfuerzo, trabajando como vendedor y gerente. Sin embargo, algo se le opone. Ambicioso por naturaleza, siempre ha codiciado el puesto que su jefe y amigo, Álvaro Reva, ha ocupado desde que lo conoció con sinceridad. La presidencia del consejo de administración de la empresa. Un cargo de difícil acceso, que, sin embargo, se le abre, aparentemente, el día que su colega le hace una oferta, difícil de explicar. 
Inmersos como están ambos, en las negociaciones que se suceden entre su equipo, y el de una compañía oriental, a la cual han realizado una oferta de adquisición de activos, Reva propone a su consejero preferido que viaje al oriente, con el objetivo de convencer a la administración del país en el cual se sitúa la sede de su nuevo socio, de la bondad, y viabilidad del proyecto, que ambos parecen estar, a punto de concluir.

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Antonio Machado. Obras Completas. Edited by Leyla Namazie. 978-1-888205-66-4 400 pages. $24.95

POETRY / European / spanish & Portuguese

Generación del 98, Hispanic poetry, Poesía moderna española, spanish poetry, literatura española.

Antonio Machado was born in Seville in 1875, the second of five brothers, in the midst of a liberal family. In 1883 the whole family moves to Madrid. Machado studied in the Institución Libre de Enseñanza, which had been founded by a friend of his father. After this, he finished his studies in two schools in Madrid, San Isidro and Cardenal Cisneros.

He travels frequently to Paris, where he meets Rubén Darío and works for a few months in the publishing company Garnier. In Madrid he takes part in the literary and theatre world, and becomes part of the troupe of María Guerrero and Fernando Díaz de Mendoza. In 1907 Machado gets the French Chair in Soria, and afterwards he travels to Paris with a scholarship to study philosophy with Bergson and Bédier. His wife dies (they had only been married for 3 years) and he asks to be moved to Baeza (Jaén) where he continued to teach spanish from 1912 to 1919.

Caminante, no hay camino,
sino estelas en la mar.
Caminante, son tus huellas
el camino, y nada más;
caminante, no hay camino,
se hace camino al andar.

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Everything That Could Not Happen Will Happen Now. By Alberto Ramirez. ISBN-13: 978-1537753591. $23.95

This book is published by Floricanto Press: www.FloricantoPress.com 
A riveting and poignant novel, “Everything That Could Not Happen Will Happen Now,” delves boldly into the issue of the racial divide in America, the stark reality of racism, and the Sisyphean struggle against its tragic repercussions.  

Latino Fiction---Social Life and customs

Fiction / Hispanic & Latino


Juan Juárez Bitol is on the verge of graduating from a prestigious California university and realizingthe American Dream. Yet in the closing weeks of his last semester—having survived the rigors of academic life and a series of racially charged incidents—he attends a lecture on Beowulf. In the explanation of Wyrd, the Anglo-Saxon belief in personal destiny, Juan receives a prophecy revealing that he, like Grendel—the monster of the epic poem and member of the “loathsome race”—is doomed. Wavering between fatalism and free will, Juan ultimately dons the mantle of monster-messiah and sets out to perform the miracle of saving himself.  

“A stunning debut novel shimmering with magical realism and lyrical beauty . . . a searing and heartbreaking portrait of alienation in America.”  - Emily C. Creigh, Co-Author “Journey to the Heart of the Condor: Love, Loss, and Survival in a South American Dictatorship.”  

“. . . Ramirez has created one of the most memorable Latino characters in a very long time with his Juan Juárez Bitol, a young man trying to stay afloat amongst the privileged denizens of elite academia . . . this is a very smart book with a heart and a message for our confused, xenophobic times.”  
-Manuel Luis Martinez, Author of “Los Duros.”  
American Book Award Winner, 2015 

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Emotions, culture, and mental illness: A short history of my father. By Luis R. Medina, Edited by Leyla Namazie. ISBN-13: 978-1888205718. 242 pages. $23.95

Latino Psychology

This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. 
In his first book, Emotions, Culture And Mental Illness: A Short History Of My Father, the author takes the reader on a poignant journey of self-discovery when he decides to go to Puerto Rico in search of “Monchito,” his psychopathic father whom he had not seen in nearly three decades. He explores the subject of emotions—primarily from the perspective of the philosopher Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677)—and debunks the widely held notion that psychopaths are “emotionless” beings. What exactly are emotions? How do we learn to feel anything? As he examines these issues, the author takes us on an anthropological field trip deep into the harsh realities of Puerto Rico’s island culture, both past and present; he tells us the story of how he learned to become an Americano through his immersion in books, movies, and the English language. He also discusses the ambiguous political status of Puerto Ricans referring to them as a “different kind of American,” who are “neither here nor there.” 

Throughout the narrative, we come face-to-face with the book’s chief subject: Monchito, his life and his times. His story is presented with brutal candor, submerging us into the depths of human suffering and the devastating effects of poverty and mental illness. Monchito’s story—told in parallel to that of the author’s—challenges the reader to explore the inseparable relationshipbetween emotions and ideas and question our notions of American identity in a fundamentally new light. 

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The Mexican Border: Immigration, War and a Trillion Dollars in Trade. By Raoul Lowery Contreras, Edited by Leyla Namazie and Roberto Cabello-Argandoña. ISBN-13: 978-1537418513. 342 pages. $23.95

U.S.-Mexico Trade and immigration; Mexican immigration, U.S.-Mexico Border Trade

This book is published by Floricanto Press. 
www.floricantopress.com 

Next door neighbor Mexico, Mexicans, trillions of dollars in commerce all became issues in the 2016 U.S. Presidential campaign… Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump attacked Mexico, Mexicans, and trade with Mexico. Trump declared Mexico is stealing American companies, stealing American jobs. The Mexican government he says is “forcing” criminals across the border to become America’s problem. Mexicans immigrants are criminals and rapists he says, though “some” Mexicans are “good people.” He promised to build a “great wall” on the Mexican border to keep people and drugs out…he would have Mexico “pay” for the wall. Essentially, Donald J. Trump declared “war” on Mexico, its government, its 122 million people, the forty million Americans of Mexican origin and iconic American companies like Ford, etc. 
Former Mexican citizens, Americans by 1848 treaty were critical to the United States victory in the American Civil War in the West. South of the border Mexicans helped Abraham Lincoln by defeating an invading French Army intent on supplying the Confederacy with arms. The Mexican victory on the 5th of May, Cinco de Mayo, was critical to the United States victory over the Confederacy. 

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Loneliness of the Soul. By James R. Dalton, Edited by Leyla Namazie and Kurt S. Maier. ISBN-13: 978-1888205688

Latin America--Poetry--Social Life and customs

This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses.

Bankruptcy, poverty, exploitation. child cruelty, ingratitude. Sounds familiar? This novel has it all. 

Stella Bernal grows up on a farm in Colombia, South America. She survives by her wits and petty crime. No work is too hard for her. Injustice makes her bitter but she never loses hope. She is determined to overcome all obstacles so she can buy the palatial home of the president for her parents. From early in life she is determined to get ahead. 


Stella cleans houses in Miami and works four jobs in Manhattan. She is exploited and abandoned by men and her own family. But she always picks herself up until her promise comes true.

 

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Crossing Bridges. By Harold Recinos. ISBN-13: 978-1888205633 $23.95

Latino barrio Fiction--Social Life and customs

Water

This is a joint publication of of Berkeley and Floricanto Presses

"This beautiful and powerful collection of poems and testimonios captures the heart and soul of the Latino experience in the New America. A remarkable montage of images, feelings, and expressions that lift the spirit and plumb the depth and promises of the American experience.” —Gaston Espinosa, Ph.D., Professor of Religious Studies, Claremont McKenna College. Author of Latino Pentecostals in America: Faith & Politics in Action (Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2014), and Religion, Race, & Barack Obama's New Democratic Pluralism (New York: Routledge, 2013).  

"This is poetry of the soul. It turns disquiet into revelation."—Ilan Stavans, Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture, Amherst College. Author of Quixote: The Novel and the World (N.Y.: W. W. Norton & Co., 2015) and Borges, the Jew. (State University of New York Press, 2016).  

 

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The Tortilla Maker: A Social and Historic Mexican American Narrative. Jesús Ignacio Loreto de Arvizu. ISBN:13: 978-1500739874. $24.95

 

Ignacia Arvizu, a strong-willed Mexican teenager lost her father, a wealthy cattleman. Bandidos murdered him and stole the family fortune including all personal possessions; he left behind only an empty hacienda. Ignacia’s mother became destitute and had no choice but to find homes for her bright and attractive daughters. In 1913, Ignacia reluctantly entered--forced by her desperate mother--into an arranged marriage to an older, prosperous rancher in Sonora, Mexico. Ignacia, affectionately called Nana by her grandchildren, fought her abusive husband to protect her five children, among them Ramona, the author’s mother. Nana’s husband suddenly died of pneumonia leaving her once again destitute and now with five small children of her own. Nana--determined to find a better life--walked over a hundred miles with her children in tow for weeks, to reach the nearest city. This brave and exciting memoir recounts Nana’s, her daughter Ramona’s, and (Ramona’s son) the author Jesus’s amazing journey from third-world poverty to American prosperity.

 

 


 

 

 

The Ones Santa Anna Sold. Valle-Sentíes, Raquel. ISBN: 978-1497473300 $15.95

“This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. These poems are powerful, immediate, and raw. And they speak of universal pain and disappointment. But also they are about a world that is unique and not so well-known this city of Laredo. As a writer, I am admiring of your perception and your style. You are a wonderful poet. ---Lori Carlson Hijuelos New York editor of Cool Salsa, Red Hot Salsa and Voices in Third Person.

Raquel Sentíes has a direct and honest poetic voice. Her poetry is lyrical without being romantic: it is sensual, ironic, questioning. It speaks to us bi-lingually: in language and in culture. She speaks of growing up and living in a world that is treacherous yet somehow in the end satisfying. There are many moments of truth in these poems which are not always easy to read but yet are always revealing. They are filled with violence, sadness, betrayal, unfulfilled longings, dreams, and of course death. The ghosts who haunt Senties’ house and her mind remind us that we too have something to contribute to these hauntings. ---Prof. Tey Diana Rebolledo, Modern Languages, Univ. of New Mexico and well known literary critic; author of Infinite Divisions and Women Singing in the Snow.

Valle-Sentíes is our coyote through these vibrant, often private poems, our guide over the border separating the living and the dead, the bought and the sold, history and her stories. She crosses readers through a landscape of violence, where the dead refuse to stay put, where chisme is truth, and where both falling and the fallen are blessed with an unsettling grace. Her book is eclectic and powerful, charged with the lives of all those who call the border home. ----Randy Koch, author of This Splintered Horse and Composing Ourselves Sentíes’ first hand experiences in Laredo and its people’s customs are palpable throughout her sometimes funny, sometimes sad but bold verses. It’s written in layman’s terms, which many of us Hispanics can relate to the Caló. -----Vilma Maldonado, book reviewer for the McAllen Monitor.

Sentíes is an accomplished poet who allows readers to feel as if they’re sneaking a peek into her diary. This book is a must read for people who have an interest in life on the border. -----Lorena Tapia, book reviewer.

The Ones Santa Anna Sold is an enchanting immersion into the world of borderlands Laredo, where Raquel Valle-Sentíes captures the taste, the emotion, and the irony of a world between worlds, between nations, between cultures, and often, pineapple and chile, the scent of jasmine and desert nopal, the beauty and harshness of Laredo’s streets and skies, and a sense of the magic and the bittersweet reality of our contemporary world, where the good, the bad, and the ugly co-exist along both sides of a murky borderland river. A magical experience! -----Dr. Carmen Tafolla, Poet Laureate of San Antonio, Texas; author of Sonnets to Human Beings and The Holy Tortilla and a Pot of Beans.

 

 

 


 

 

The Armor of Love and Hope. By Doris Mercado. Yasmeen Namazie, Editor. ISBN 978-1494245993. $24.95.

This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. Doris Mercado’s memoir is one of perseverance and reconciliation, reminiscent of Tobias Wolff’s This Boy’s Life and Ernesto Galarza’s Barrio Boy. Her story is partly one of family but also one of self-reliance, recounting her troubled childhood in Ponce, Puerto Rico and also poverty and homelessness in Massachusetts. What I most admired in the work was the author’s frankness, her ability to portray family truths so intimately and honestly. –John Paul Jaramillo, author of The House of Order Stories.

Kirkus Review: Mercado’s memoir chronicles how a middle child from a large family experiences love, forgiveness and hope despite a lifetime of abuse, neglect and abandonment in the mountains of Puerto Rico. The memoir opens with scenes of an idyllic childhood. Mercado lived in a small town outside Ponce, Puerto Rico, where her life included colorful characters in a bustling community. There were eight children at the beginning of Mercado’s story, all battling to use a single bathroom and hairbrush. Doris’ mother, Lina, worked as a seamstress. She was stern, but she encouraged 4-year-old Doris to read the newspaper.

Doris’ father was well-liked and played affectionately with the children in their chaotic but happy household. Within two years, two more boys were born into the Mercado family; both needed extensive medical attention. The strain took its toll, and finally, the family moved in with Doris’ beloved grandmother in the mountain town of Jayuya. After the move, Doris’ life deteriorated. Her mother beat her repeatedly with a broomstick, and Doris spent many days nursing badly bruised limbs. Life continued to fall apart for the Mercado clan, particularly when Doris’ paternal grandmother invited Lina and the youngest children to New York for a fresh start.

Doris and five of her siblings were left in the care of their father, although it was 14-year-old Doris who assumed chief responsibility. Within days of her mother’s departure, Doris’ father also walked out without explanation, leaving Doris and the others to fend for themselves. This living arrangement continued for another three years. Doris warned the children to keep their situation secret, so they wouldn’t alert the authorities. This profoundly sad story of neglect is told in simple, direct language. Doris’ capacity for forgiveness is astonishing, as is her single-minded focus on the love she feels for the brothers and sister left in her care. She eventually moved to the U.S., and her reunification with her parents was filled with more pain and abuse. Mercado’s reaching adulthood in one piece is remarkable; arriving with her soul intact is miraculous. A straightforward, moving story about resilience.

 

 

In order of publication

 


 

 

 


 

 

 

The Tortilla Maker: A Social and Historic Mexican American Narrative. Jesús Ignacio Loreto de Arvizu. ISBN:13: 978-1500739874. $24.95

 

Ignacia Arvizu, a strong-willed Mexican teenager lost her father, a wealthy cattleman. Bandidos murdered him and stole the family fortune including all personal possessions; he left behind only an empty hacienda. Ignacia’s mother became destitute and had no choice but to find homes for her bright and attractive daughters. In 1913, Ignacia reluctantly entered--forced by her desperate mother--into an arranged marriage to an older, prosperous rancher in Sonora, Mexico. Ignacia, affectionately called Nana by her grandchildren, fought her abusive husband to protect her five children, among them Ramona, the author’s mother. Nana’s husband suddenly died of pneumonia leaving her once again destitute and now with five small children of her own. Nana--determined to find a better life--walked over a hundred miles with her children in tow for weeks, to reach the nearest city. This brave and exciting memoir recounts Nana’s, her daughter Ramona’s, and (Ramona’s son) the author Jesus’s amazing journey from third-world poverty to American prosperity.

 

 


 

 

 

The Ones Santa Anna Sold. Valle-Sentíes, Raquel. ISBN: 978-1497473300 $15.95

“This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. These poems are powerful, immediate, and raw. And they speak of universal pain and disappointment. But also they are about a world that is unique and not so well-known this city of Laredo. As a writer, I am admiring of your perception and your style. You are a wonderful poet. ---Lori Carlson Hijuelos New York editor of Cool Salsa, Red Hot Salsa and Voices in Third Person.

Raquel Sentíes has a direct and honest poetic voice. Her poetry is lyrical without being romantic: it is sensual, ironic, questioning. It speaks to us bi-lingually: in language and in culture. She speaks of growing up and living in a world that is treacherous yet somehow in the end satisfying. There are many moments of truth in these poems which are not always easy to read but yet are always revealing. They are filled with violence, sadness, betrayal, unfulfilled longings, dreams, and of course death. The ghosts who haunt Senties’ house and her mind remind us that we too have something to contribute to these hauntings. ---Prof. Tey Diana Rebolledo, Modern Languages, Univ. of New Mexico and well known literary critic; author of Infinite Divisions and Women Singing in the Snow.

Valle-Sentíes is our coyote through these vibrant, often private poems, our guide over the border separating the living and the dead, the bought and the sold, history and her stories. She crosses readers through a landscape of violence, where the dead refuse to stay put, where chisme is truth, and where both falling and the fallen are blessed with an unsettling grace. Her book is eclectic and powerful, charged with the lives of all those who call the border home. ----Randy Koch, author of This Splintered Horse and Composing Ourselves Sentíes’ first hand experiences in Laredo and its people’s customs are palpable throughout her sometimes funny, sometimes sad but bold verses. It’s written in layman’s terms, which many of us Hispanics can relate to the Caló. -----Vilma Maldonado, book reviewer for the McAllen Monitor.

Sentíes is an accomplished poet who allows readers to feel as if they’re sneaking a peek into her diary. This book is a must read for people who have an interest in life on the border. -----Lorena Tapia, book reviewer.

The Ones Santa Anna Sold is an enchanting immersion into the world of borderlands Laredo, where Raquel Valle-Sentíes captures the taste, the emotion, and the irony of a world between worlds, between nations, between cultures, and often, pineapple and chile, the scent of jasmine and desert nopal, the beauty and harshness of Laredo’s streets and skies, and a sense of the magic and the bittersweet reality of our contemporary world, where the good, the bad, and the ugly co-exist along both sides of a murky borderland river. A magical experience! -----Dr. Carmen Tafolla, Poet Laureate of San Antonio, Texas; author of Sonnets to Human Beings and The Holy Tortilla and a Pot of Beans.

 

 

 


 

 

The Armor of Love and Hope. By Doris Mercado. Yasmeen Namazie, Editor. ISBN 978-1494245993. $24.95.

This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. Doris Mercado’s memoir is one of perseverance and reconciliation, reminiscent of Tobias Wolff’s This Boy’s Life and Ernesto Galarza’s Barrio Boy. Her story is partly one of family but also one of self-reliance, recounting her troubled childhood in Ponce, Puerto Rico and also poverty and homelessness in Massachusetts. What I most admired in the work was the author’s frankness, her ability to portray family truths so intimately and honestly. –John Paul Jaramillo, author of The House of Order Stories.

Kirkus Review: Mercado’s memoir chronicles how a middle child from a large family experiences love, forgiveness and hope despite a lifetime of abuse, neglect and abandonment in the mountains of Puerto Rico. The memoir opens with scenes of an idyllic childhood. Mercado lived in a small town outside Ponce, Puerto Rico, where her life included colorful characters in a bustling community. There were eight children at the beginning of Mercado’s story, all battling to use a single bathroom and hairbrush. Doris’ mother, Lina, worked as a seamstress. She was stern, but she encouraged 4-year-old Doris to read the newspaper.

Doris’ father was well-liked and played affectionately with the children in their chaotic but happy household. Within two years, two more boys were born into the Mercado family; both needed extensive medical attention. The strain took its toll, and finally, the family moved in with Doris’ beloved grandmother in the mountain town of Jayuya. After the move, Doris’ life deteriorated. Her mother beat her repeatedly with a broomstick, and Doris spent many days nursing badly bruised limbs. Life continued to fall apart for the Mercado clan, particularly when Doris’ paternal grandmother invited Lina and the youngest children to New York for a fresh start.

Doris and five of her siblings were left in the care of their father, although it was 14-year-old Doris who assumed chief responsibility. Within days of her mother’s departure, Doris’ father also walked out without explanation, leaving Doris and the others to fend for themselves. This living arrangement continued for another three years. Doris warned the children to keep their situation secret, so they wouldn’t alert the authorities. This profoundly sad story of neglect is told in simple, direct language. Doris’ capacity for forgiveness is astonishing, as is her single-minded focus on the love she feels for the brothers and sister left in her care. She eventually moved to the U.S., and her reunification with her parents was filled with more pain and abuse. Mercado’s reaching adulthood in one piece is remarkable; arriving with her soul intact is miraculous. A straightforward, moving story about resilience.

 

 

 

 

 

A Century of Pachangas. By Betty Serra. ISBN: 978-1491259207 $19.95

This is a publication of Floricanto Press. A Century of Pachangas (parties) is a deluxe package of celebrations, featuring ribbon-cutting family drama. The helium balloons in this pachanga are a series of inflated scandals due to infidelity, lunatic rage and psychological imbalances. Like all families, there is loss and tragedy, but resilience triumphs over their fixations and shortcomings. This Latino family memoir focuses on the author’s maternal side of the family, starting with Rosa Balladares, born in 1884 in Managua, Nicaragua. Orphaned at the age of two, Rosa grew up quickly and left her uncle’s unhappy home within a decade. Relatively a young teen, she achieved total independence and later transformed herself into a woman that ruled her household with absoluteness, dispensing proclamations as if a medieval dungeon awaited anyone who failed to follow her majestic orders. Unlike most women of her era, she was skilled in the art of fist-fighting, shooting pistols and swordplay. And although she couldn’t read or write, she was brilliant in that she ran a house, a business and scoundrels out of town. The first half of the memoir (beginning in 1884) introduces the core of the Balladares Family, which consists of Rosa, the wandering husband she threatened to shoot and five daughters who survived into adulthood. The women turned out inflexible, controlling and overbearing, just like their mother. They had the audacity to want to set the world straight in the midst of their own family chaos and meltdowns. The few men who came to know or love them were forcibly exiled, and the grandchildren were indisputably named Balladares. It wasn’t until the next generation, particularly those born in the U.S.A. when the Balladares surname lost its elasticity to band everyone and the newborns were named after their fathers. The second half of the memoir (beginning in 1952) highlights the immigration of a few Balladares women into the States and their wacky adventures. The author, a Balladares descendent, reminisces over her childhood memories, the merging of two colorful cultures and the meddling of Latin American relatives dropping in and out, causing insurmountable disturbances. Each of the Balladares women reappears, sporadically throughout the memoir. They’re all much older, but not necessarily wiser. Oftentimes, it’s their children or grandchildren who complete the lesson for them. Still, it’s mind-blowing how their fiery spirit enabled them to reach another country, cross into a new century and stamp the Balladares imprint of tenacity onto subsequent generations.

 

 

 

 

 

I Will Be An American . . . Someday Soon: The Questions & Answers to the Citizenship Test. Bloomfield, Gary L. ISBN: 978-1481012690 $10.00

This is a publication of Floricanto Press.

This is a publication of Floricanto Press. Gary Bloomfield’s has compiled and developed a list of the most frequent questions asked for the American citizenship test administered by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) to those applying for U.S. citizenship. This questionnaire includes the precise answer to each of its questions. Those immigrants who desire to become American Citizens will be very well served preparing themselves for this test using and studying this brief manual.

 


 

 

 

 

Island of Dreams. By Jasminne Méndez. ISBN 978-1493580880. $13.95.

“My family has been forced to live like an island with no political party, president, or official language. We are not of any 'new world' Columbus discovered. We are not Dominican enough or American enough to call either place home. We live and love with one foot on the ground and one foot in the sea.” This is how Jasminne Méndez describes what it was like for her to grow up a Dominican American military brat. Always feeling like a foreigner in both lands because people want to know “where you from,” and “how do you know spanish?” In "Island of Dreams," author Jasminne Méndez, addresses these questions and their complicated answers in a multi-genre memoir that effortlessly blends poems and short stories to offer a glimpse into the challenges, joys, hopes, fears and disappointments she and her family faced being Dominican in America. Her work explores everything from the love/hate relationship she had with her hair and her mother, to the many memorable but sometimes unpleasant family vacations and holidays she shared with her parents, siblings, primos, tíos, y tías. These captivating stories and poems are about family, food, love, culture, self-discovery, assimilation, and the American dream. They are about a young girl who respects the richness and abundance of her cultural history, but who struggles to form her own identity because her Dominican values conflict with her American self and all she wants to do is find a place to call home. Join memoir-writer Jasminne Méndez in this luscious recalling of her family’s multi-faceted sojourn of family ties and their meaning, glorious cooking and eating, belonging and not belonging, and so many other complicated forays into the storied past. Sarah Cortéz, author, Walking Home: Growing Up Hispanic in Houston.

Jasminne builds bridges between many worlds. Her potent voice conjures images of the Dominican Republican, Texas, Houston, the world. I've had the pleasure of seeing her perform in person. She is amazing in 3D. Actually, she performs in 6D-adding spirit, whimsy, and the future. She code-switches so brilliantly that you don't notice that she has jumped from spanish to English to spanglish to universal themes and back. Her work not only stands up on the page but takes on new meaning with potency, shattering barriers, breaking borders. This book will boggle your mind and thrill you. Tony Díaz, El Librotraficante, founder of Nuestra Palabra: Latino Writers Having Their Say.

 

 


 

 

 

La vendedora de nubes. Clouds for Sale. Poniatowska, Elena. ISBN: 978-1499244564 $14.95

This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. This book is part of Floricanto's Children's and Juvenile Book Collection.

A little girl had a dream that became a reality: a beautiful cloud that followed her everywhere. One morning she decided she had to sell her pet cloud, because her family was very poor. She led the cloud to the farmers’ market and started calling out “Cloud for Sale!” A lot of customers came by, but they all wanted to use the cloud for their own purposes. Choosing a new owner for the cloud was not an easy task. Who do you think took off with the cloud? 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Latino and Latina Leaders of the 21st Century: Ordinary Beginnings, Extraordinary Outcomes. Kayla García. ISBN: 978-1888205480 $24.95

This book is published jointly by Floricanto Press and Berkeley Press. Latino issues are everybody’s issues. The Latino and Latina leaders portrayed in this book have made valuable contributions to our social, legal, political and educational systems. This book provides comprehensive stories of courageous men and women who have defied expectations, overcome adversity, set precedents, and dedicated significant time and energy to helping others achieve their goals. Active locally, nationally, and internationally in a variety of professions, these individuals offer proof that ordinary or even humble origins can lead to extraordinary accomplishments. This collective biography expounds on well-known and otherwise Latino leaders who are at the front of their fields. It includes well-known individuals, such as Sonia Sotomayor, First Latina on the Supreme Court; Dolores Huerta, Union Organizer and Community Activist; Jorge Ramos, News Anchor and Advocate; John Haroldson and María Chávez-Haroldson, District Attorney and Leadership Facilitator; and Sandra Cisneros, Author and Activist. It includes, as well, many others, such as Julián Castro, Mayor of San Antonio; Nydia Velázquez, Representative for New York; Luis Gutiérrez, Representative for Illinois; Marco Rubio, Senator for Florida. It also comprises leaders in fields of education, community activism, and literary figures such as Cherríe Moraga, Advocate for LGBTQ, Latinos, and Indigenous People, and Elena Poniatowska, an internationally known ally to Latinos.

 

 


 

 

 

 

Los Duros. By Manuel Luis Martínez. ISBN: 978-1497473553 $24.95

This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. Los Duros is a destitute colonia suffocating in the brutal heat of the Mojave Desert. Families must live without running water or electricity as they attempt to survive on the edge of the Salton Sea, a toxic lake where dead fish rot and poisons pollute the shore. The reality of living in the shanty wastelands of the affluent jewel cities of southern California threatens to destroy two young men living in desperate poverty and abandonment. On a night of unthinkable violence, Banger and Tarasco will be thrust together as they confront the tragic circumstances that threatens to claim them as two more squandered casualties to the callous indifference suffered by those forced to live in the shadows. Guillermo, an idealistic teacher, and Juan, the long-absent father of one of the boys, are desperate to help them when Banger and Tarasco become suspects in a local arson and double-murder. Los Duros examines the role of fate in the lives of a generation of forgotten children; can love achieve redemption for a tortured father and raise the hope that origin does not constitute destiny? This is a crucial and timely story of a place that seems far away, but exists in the darkest recesses of our America and its dissipated dream.

“In the tradition of Richard Vásquez and Tomás Rivera, Martinez brings to life the bleak — though not hopeless — world of Los Duros, a colonia of poor Latinos and undocumented workers located outside the wealth and sprawl of Palm Springs. Following the intertwined lives of four of its residents — a high school teacher newly arrived from San Antonio who uses his classroom for activism and uplift; one of his students, a man-sized Native American boy trying to hide from the world within his silence; another student, brash and angry and with a wild streak; and that boy’s estranged father, recently released from the penitentiary and wanting to atone for all the ways in which he has failed his son — Los Duros is Border Realism at its best, John Steinbeck in twenty-first century brown skin.” --David Wright, author of Fire on the Beach: Recovering the Lost Story of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Lifesavers

“Los Duros is a haunting story of racism and poverty and sacrifice and love. Manuel Luis Martinez writes with such courage and grace, and he has much to show us about the comings and goings of people forced to the edge. The characters and events of this novel are unforgettable.” --Lee Martin, author of The Bright Forever

Manuel Luis Martinez is a native Texan currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and daughter. He serves as an associate professor of twentieth century American literature, American studies, Chicano/Latino studies, and creative writing at the Ohio State University. His novels include, Crossing, Drift, and Day of the Dead. Most recently, he was inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters. For a student study guide with news articles, interviews, documentaries, and other features including interaction with the author, please visit: www.facebook.com/LosDurosNovel. You may visit the author’s webpage: ManuelMartinez.info, or email him at memorybabe@me.com.

 

 


 

 

 

A Most Memorable Quinceañera. Una Quinceañera Muy Memorable. By Leslie Concepción. ISBN: 978-1494253776 $14.95

This is a publication of Floricanto Press. “Saying goodbye to childhood is never easy.” The magical day, when a girl can play out her own fairytale fantasy and be a princess for a day, is her Quinceañera, and for Mimi that day has finally arrived. But instead of the excitement and jubilation she is expected to feel, all she can summon is uneasy dread and anxiety about what this day means. Her parents have been planning this event her whole life and Mimi is filled with the weight of their expectations, to act like a proper lady and know what to do. She doesn't know what to do and can’t comprehend how an archaic ceremony can change the way people see her, and how she could be a woman just because the calendar marks her a day older. Mimi doesn’t want people to treat her differently and no amount of rehearsing can mask the insecurities she feels. To make matters worse her cousin, Lala, picks the day of Mimi's Quinceañera to reveal she is pregnant, and it's only been a year after her very own Quinceañera. Mimi is distraught and believes that is what happens when parents, family, and society, rush a girl into womanhood. This is all the more reason for Mimi not to accept the tradition of publically becoming a woman. This is a coming of age story about two cousins, who are the best of friends. While her cousin, Lala is thrilled to enter womanhood, Mimi is not so enthusiastic and doesn’t feel she is ready for all the social responsibilities that come along with being a woman. The girls will learn to stick together and that the bond between family is stronger than any rite of passage. A very elaborate descriptive and story about the conflicts and tribulations in a young girls’ life as she enters womanhood. Everyone needs a Tia Emmi in their life. By Judy Paneto-Roman

Great book about the the Quinceañera culture. As a mom of a soon to be teenager, I will pass down this book to my daughter so that she can learn about the culture and the importance of family. Jessica Cortez

A most memorable story I was quickly captivated by this story, as I can certainly relate to all the drama and prepping that goes into planning "Sweet 15" Quinceañera it's something we all look forward to when coming of age, Leslie's story is definitely something I would hand my daughter prior to her Quinceañera. Veronica Paneto

Mimi’s character transported me back to a time in my life where I was caught between innocence and the impending “Real” world. Her struggle is personal and heartwarmingly portrayed and I was easily wrapped up in the story. Deborah Rosa, MA

A Most Memorable Quinceañera, is a wonderfully human and culturally sensitive story about a Latina girl's passage from childhood to womanhood. Mrs. Concepcion captures all the fears and apprehensions of this passage from a young person's point of view and allows her characters to make mistakes and misjudgments along the way. The author's interweaving of the Quinceañera ceremony makes for a fascinating exploration of growing up. In the end, the greatest discovery is that no one has to fear the future if there is love and support around you. Gayle S. Hoffman, MSW, ACSW.

 

 

 


 

 

 

Noldo and his Magical Scooter at the Battle of The Alamo=Noldo y su patinete mágico en la Batalla de El Álamo. By Armando Rendón. ISBN 978-1490428659. $14.95.

Noldo is a Mexican-American boy, who, after building his own scooter from scraps, is magically transported from 1950’s San Antonio, Texas, into the middle of of the Battle of the Alamo (February 23 – March 6, 1836), where he befriends a lad who lived more than a hundred years earlier. He lives through hard times, making do with very little. The story forges a link for Chicanos to their historical roots in the Southwest, revealing a past that has been otherwise excluded from school textbooks and the mass media. Noldo es un chico mexicoamericano, quien, después de construir su propio patinete de materiales de desecho, es mágicamente transportado del San Antonio de los años 50’s a la Batalla de el Álamo, en donde se hace amigo de un muchacho que había vivido más que cien años antes.

Él vive aquellos tiempos tan difíciles, siendo muy creativo con lo poco que tiene. La historia tiende un puente que va desde los chicanos de hoy día hasta sus raíces históricas en el Suroeste, revelándonos una historia que ha sido excluida de los libros de texto y de los medios de comunicación. Armando Rendón grew up in the Westside barrio of San Antonio, Texas, and much of our hero’s story and background sounds a lot like the life and times of the author. Armando moved to California in 1950 and lives near Berkeley with his wife, Helen. He authored Chicano Manifesto, the first book about Chicanos by a Chicano, in 1971. He is also the founder and editor of the online literary magazine, Somos en escrito, which he launched in November 2009.

Armando Rendón creció en el barrio del oeste de San Antonio, Tejas, y gran parte de la historia de su héroe y de su ambiente semejan bastante la vida y la época de su autor. Armando se mudó a California en 1950, vive en Berkeley, California, con su esposa, Helen. Armando es autor del Chicano Manifesto, el primer libro sobre los chicanos escrito por un chicano, en 1971. Es fundador y editor de la revista cibernética, Somos en escrito, creada en noviembre de 2009.


 

 

 

The Ones Santa Anna Sold. Valle-Sentíes, Raquel. ISBN: 978-1497473300 $15.95

“This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. These poems are powerful, immediate, and raw. And they speak of universal pain and disappointment. But also they are about a world that is unique and not so well-known this city of Laredo. As a writer, I am admiring of your perception and your style. You are a wonderful poet. ---Lori Carlson Hijuelos New York editor of Cool Salsa, Red Hot Salsa and Voices in Third Person.

Raquel Sentíes has a direct and honest poetic voice. Her poetry is lyrical without being romantic: it is sensual, ironic, questioning. It speaks to us bi-lingually: in language and in culture. She speaks of growing up and living in a world that is treacherous yet somehow in the end satisfying. There are many moments of truth in these poems which are not always easy to read but yet are always revealing. They are filled with violence, sadness, betrayal, unfulfilled longings, dreams, and of course death. The ghosts who haunt Senties’ house and her mind remind us that we too have something to contribute to these hauntings. ---Prof. Tey Diana Rebolledo, Modern Languages, Univ. of New Mexico and well known literary critic; author of Infinite Divisions and Women Singing in the Snow.

Valle-Sentíes is our coyote through these vibrant, often private poems, our guide over the border separating the living and the dead, the bought and the sold, history and her stories. She crosses readers through a landscape of violence, where the dead refuse to stay put, where chisme is truth, and where both falling and the fallen are blessed with an unsettling grace. Her book is eclectic and powerful, charged with the lives of all those who call the border home. ----Randy Koch, author of This Splintered Horse and Composing Ourselves

Sentíes’ first hand experiences in Laredo and its people’s customs are palpable throughout her sometimes funny, sometimes sad but bold verses. It’s written in layman’s terms, which many of us Hispanics can relate to the Caló. -----Vilma Maldonado, book reviewer for the McAllen Monitor.

Sentíes is an accomplished poet who allows readers to feel as if they’re sneaking a peek into her diary. This book is a must read for people who have an interest in life on the border. -----Lorena Tapia, book reviewer

The Ones Santa Anna Sold is an enchanting immersion into the world of borderlands Laredo, where Raquel Valle-Sentíes captures the taste, the emotion, and the irony of a world between worlds, between nations, between cultures, and often, pineapple and chile, the scent of jasmine and desert nopal, the beauty and harshness of Laredo’s streets and skies, and a sense of the magic and the bittersweet reality of our contemporary world, where the good, the bad, and the ugly co-exist along both sides of a murky borderland river. A magical experience! -----Dr. Carmen Tafolla, Poet Laureate of San Antonio, Texas; author of Sonnets to Human Beings and The Holy Tortilla and a Pot of Beans.

 

 


 

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Pig Behind The Bear. By Maria Nieto. Edited by Ms. Yasmeen Namazie and Jose Hernández; Illustrated by Celeste McCarty. ISBN 978-1480093676. $19.95.

It is 1971, one year after the killing of famed LA Times reporter, Rubén Salazar. A junior reporter, Alejandra Marisol, who works for the LA Times is asked to write a commemorative piece on Salazar in recognition of the one-year anniversary of his death. While doing work for the piece, Alejandra finds that she is embroiled in a murder mystery that appears to have ties to Ruben Salazar's death. Alejandra uncovers a world of evil and corruption with the help of an unlikely collection of people who become heroes and who challenge us to think differently about ourselves and the world we live in; Rocky the philosophizing WWI veteran, Sumire, the clairvoyant ex-Japanese internment camp prisoner, Tia (Aunt) Carmen, the wise-cracker who can wield a powerful left leg jab with a retractable prosthesis, Tony and Chucho, the neighborhood homeboys, and Gato the wonder cat.

Alejandra also gets help from a dancing Jesus who feels misunderstood, and from his mom, Mary, who bestows Alejandra with a tube of lipstick that helps Alejandra unleash her inner strength. The reader will travel through streets and townships where rich Angelino culture comes to life, and where tragedy and despair are transformed into hope.

 


 

 

 

 

Poems of Ramón López Velarde. Ramón López Velarde. Edited and translated by Mark Jacobs. ISBN: 978-1494243791 $22.95

“The essential and supreme poet of our extensive Americas.” —Nobel Laureate Pablo Neruda

“López Velarde is the most admired and most carefully studied poet in Mexico . . . [He] left us a few poems . . . so perfect that it is foolish to lament those that death prevented him from writing.”—Nobel Laureate Octavio Paz

“López Velarde . . . was a wonder.” —Jorge Luis Borges

Millions of Mexicans know Ramón López Velarde as the author of Suave Patria, the national poem of Mexico, and a modernist masterpiece. But few inside or outside Mexico know the high opinion of him held by his fellow greats of Latin American poetry. López Velarde's Wikipedia entry correctly states: “Despite his importance, he remains a virtual unknown outside his own country.” As an example of how unknown, all the other major Mexican poets (and even some minor ones) are in The Oxford Book of Latin American Poetry, but not López Velarde. He is truly a forgotten modernist master. In 1963, Pablo Neruda published his own selection of the poems of López Velarde. The Chilean Nobel Laureate even rented rooms in a former residence of López Velarde's where Neruda "began to live in the full atmosphere of López Velarde, whose poetry began to penetrate me . . . There is no more distilled poetry than his . . . [He] gave to the poetry of the Americas a flavor and a fragrance that will last forever . . . Few poets with so few words have told us so much and so eternally of their own land . . . [His] brief pages reach, in some subtle way, the eternity of poetry."


 

 

 

Por caminos errantes. By Robert Lima. ISBN: 978-1494354367 $14.95

This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. "Caminos errantes" is a collection of poems by Robert Lima. This poetry book is presented in four sections: I ABECEDARIO. II ARQUEO-ANTROPOLOGÍA. A. Maya. B. Andina. III SITIOS HABANEROS. IV CALLES LIMEÑAS. The poems evoke desire and physical presence, and the sharing of his personal experience of his relationship to the objects and places in the temporal world. It is an explication for why his own impressions are vitally important. His voice does not allow us to look away from his lyrical experience. Una colección de poemas en castellano por Robert Lima.

 

 


 

 

Por la Calle North Claremont: Beto Stories. By Adolfo Butch Cárdenas. Edited by Yasmeen Namazie and Genevieve Miller. ISBN 978-1481182911. $22.95.

In a world of literacy education where Hispanic literature is still a rarity, Por la Calle North Claremont: Beto Stories are a gem in that it will provide students with the confidence to see the importance of their own childhood experiences. Students can read this book knowing that Hispanic literature does not have to portray children in worlds of poverty with barrios full of unloving parents, racial turmoil, rampant crime, dog-eat-dog politics, and other hopeless situations. The author provides children with the hope of living a life with the same good natured character Beto encourages, and he also gives voice to those of us who grew up in happy homes, with loving parents and good friends. Of course, the book is true to reality in that Beto does experience the usual turmoil many children face such as not always getting everything he wants, stressful school relations, family disputes and corporal punishment. Yet, Beto ends up okay with the help of those who at times drive him crazy, yet love him always—his friends and family. The book’s ending will also leave students wondering what happens next to Beto as he grows into a fine young man, always honest, loyal, responsible, and fun-loving.


 

 

 

Shattered Dreams: The story of a historic ICE raid in the words of the detainees. Gibbs, Virginia; and Luz María Hernández, Editors.ISBN: 978-1491086377 $25.95

This is a joint publication of Floricanto and Berkeley Presses. In May of 2008, the small town of Postville, Iowa, experienced an Immigration Raid in which nearly 400 Latino immigrant workers in the meat processing industry were arrested. The Postville Raid, the second largest in U.S. history, was the first and last of its kind. Instead of immediately deporting the undocumented, they were tried in groups of ten on charges of identity theft and then sent to jail for 5 ½ months. A group of 40 women were arrested but released with GPS monitors on their ankles so that they could care for young children, and were held in Postville for over a year during which they were not allowed to work to support their families. These are the life stories, told in their own words, of some of the workers who were affected by the raid. The immigrant families, with special emphasis on women and children, share the stories of their childhoods, the decision and the journey to “El Norte,” working at the meat processing plant, and the raid and its aftermath. These true stories vividly portray the fear, violence and harassment that is the lot of those who are “undocumented,” but also shows their strength of spirit in the face of poverty-stricken childhoods, dangerous border crossings, inhumane working conditions, and as they experienced the U.S. legal and penal system. "The long-silenced voices of the humble migrants victimized by the infamous federal raid at Postville, Iowa are recovered at last in this volume, where they coalesce into a gentle mallet that strikes at the gong of our national conscience, issuing a wake-up call to our humanity. Our only dignified answer should be fair and lasting immigration reform." --Erik Camayd-Freixas, author of U.S. Immigration Reform and its Global Impact: Lessons from the Postville Raid.


 

 

 

The Surrounding Sea. Friedman, Robert. ISBN: 978-1495934742 $22.95

This is a publication of Floricanto Press. The year is 2000 in Puerto Rico. Stevie Pérez and his girlfriend, Laura Rosario, have joined a student protest against the U.S. Navy’s bombing exercises that have caused illness, environmental damages and death on the offshore island of Vieques. The Riot Squad is called onto the campus to quell the protest and in the ensuing violence, Laura is hit by a stray bullet and killed. A grieving Stevie vows to keep Laura’s memory alive by creating a scholarship in her name. He is frustrated in attempts to get help in the community and decides to become a drug mule to obtain the scholarship money. After a few lucrative trips, he is set up in a drug theft. His 20-year-old life in danger, Stevie is forced to flee as the drug gang pursues him from the Bronx to San Juan to the mountain towns of Puerto Rico. Along the way, Stevie learns hard truths about life, love and loss.

 

 


 

Twitching Heart. By Matt Méndez. Edited by Yasmeen Namazie and Genevieve Miller. ISBN 978-1480257023. $17.95.

This is exactly how a winning debut should read—fluid and raw, redemptive and inevitable. Underneath the humor runs a gifted storyteller’s nuanced take on the paradox of the outsider. A triumphant first swing from one of the new stars in the next generation of Chicano lit. --Manuel Muñoz, author of What You See in the Dark

Méndez’s stories emerge out of the gritty and working-class barrios of El Paso. At times gesturing towards the magical realism south of the border, his characters struggle to carve out a piece of the “American Dream,” but the difficulties they endure often leave them speechless. This is where Méndez’s strength as a writer is most visible. While his characters struggle to find the right words, he does not. His prose is restrained, his metaphors apt, and his details are damn near perfect. The desert might be unforgiving, but Méndez is able to impart a degree of grace into his stories without resorting to sentimentality. One of the sharpest young writers in the Southwest, he gives voice to a region that has remained on the periphery of American literature for far too long. His will be a career to watch closely. --D. Seth Horton, Series Editor, New Stories from the Southwest and Series Co-Editor, Best of the West: New Stories from the Wide Side of the Missouri

El Paso is at the center of the new map of the West. Matt Méndez writes from, and about, Chuco's heart. --Dagoberto Gilb, author of Before the End, After the Beginning

Born in El Paso (Chuco), TX Matt Méndez joined after the Air Force after graduating high school and after four years of active duty moved to Tucson, AZ where he works as an aircraft technician. He attended Pima Community College and the University of Arizona where he graduated magna cum laude with a B.A in Media Arts. He went on to earn an MFA from the University of Arizona where he has taught fiction and other writing courses. Matt Méndez has been a speaker for Pima Community College’s Adelante Program, a program designed to help Chicanos earn college degrees, a community organizer working with teachers from TUSDs banned MAS curriculum, and a facilitator of creative writing workshops with Tucson youth. He also reviews books for the El Paso Times and currently lives in Tucson with his wife and daughter.

 

 


 

 

 

Words of Power: Adages, Axioms and Aphorisms. By Ramón del Valle-Inclán. Translated with commentary by Robert Lima. ISBN 978-1484876022. $20.95.

Words of Power collects the ingenious adages, axioms and aphorisms culled from Ramón del Valle-Inclán’s plays, novels, poems, stories, interviews, letters and aesthetic treatises. Valle-Inclán lived a full and social life in which he interacted and influenced many writers, painters and composers of his period through his verbal and written wisdom. His insights into life and Art are gathered in Words of Power, together with illustrations of the man and his works. These have been collected and translated by the internationally-known writer, Robert Lima.

“ . . . the writings of Valle-Inclán ought to be engraved in enduring letters, in large clear letters on impressive folios, letters that would permit the appreciation of the exactness and delicacy of phrasing, the marvelous way of narrating beautiful things without recourse to artifice or base devices.” Juan Ramón Jiménez, spanish Nobel Prize Winner.

“ . . . the copious anecdotes of his (Valle-Inclán’s) life will be used … to cast light on the depths of his personality.” Antonio Machado, Poet of Spain’s “Generation of 1898.”

“Through his beautiful and poetic stage directions, Valle-Inclán has given us a lesson in theatre technique . . . we can place the most fundamental staging techniques at the disposal of his magnificent words, the eloquent words which Valle-Inclán casts before us from the stage with a vigor and sonority which few dramatists anywhere have achieved.” José Tamayo, Theatre Director, Spain.

“Some people are capable of thinking of two things at once, but only Galicians are capable of thinking about three.” Salvador de Madariaga spanish Philosopher and Critic.

Robert Lima is Professor Emeritus of spanish and Comparative Literatures at The Pennsylvania State University, as well as Fellow Emeritus of the Institute for the Arts and Humanistic Studies; Academician, Academia Norteamericana de la Lengua Española; Corresponding Member of the Real Academia Española. He has been honored as an initiate of Enxebre Orden da Vieira, and was dubbed Knight Commander (Encomienda de Número) in the Orden de Isabel la Católica by His Majesty King Juan Carlos I of Spain.